Terry McDermott

Terry McDermott V1 [ Registered ]

CCIEBS No. 12176 Member,Joined at 2016-02-27 18:07:59

  • Terry McDermott Recently Comments
  • 1 Years Ago

    Comment to Topic Posted by Terry McDermott › The Politics Of Massage: Alternative Treatment Or Mainstream
  •   So I echo the plea of Rodney King when he asked, “Can’t we all just get along?” Massage does not need the blessing of the medical establishment to claim its place among the healing arts, thank you. Nor is it the exclusive therapeutic domain of the alternative community. I am comfortable with claims that massage can benefit the whole person and I welcome the recognition of the scientific examiners who methodically study the benefits of touch for healing. But I intend to plant myself firmly in the middle and surrender to no particular ideology of massage therapy. I endorse massage for what it does.
  • 1 Years Ago

    Comment to Topic Posted by Terry McDermott › The Politics Of Massage: Alternative Treatment Or Mainstream
  •   That is not to say that the more clinical modern approach to massage is without merit. On the contrary, contemporary research has validated many of the formerly unsubstantiated claims of alternative practitioners. Scientific studies have confirmed the effectiveness of massage in alleviating some depressive symptoms, altering the immune system, controlling pain and reducing stress. As stress is identified as the precipitator of so many medical problems, physicians are less reluctant to recommend massage as part of an overall regime to address certain conditions.
  • 1 Years Ago

    Comment to Topic Posted by Terry McDermott › The Politics Of Massage: Alternative Treatment Or Mainstream
  •   But with the advent of the industrial age and the development of modern scientific inquiry, massage was relegated to the list of unenlightened, unsophisticated medical practices. In my opinion, however, to dismiss the medicinal and restorative benefits of massage was to dismiss the wisdom of the Ancients. The lack of modern scientific diagnostic techniques and the inability to examine the physical being at the cellular level, forced the earliest physicians to take a macro view of the person since a micro view was unavailable. That macro view and the knowledge garnered through the ages is still the essence of the practice of the ancient art of massage.
  • 1 Years Ago

    Comment to Topic Posted by Terry McDermott › The Politics Of Massage: Alternative Treatment Or Mainstream
  •   At the same time, similar approaches were evolving in India, eventually becoming the practice of Ayurvedic medicine, or the “arts of life,” which also utilized massage as an instrumental healing methodology. Greeks, Romans and even Native Americans highly valued not just the therapeutic, but also the actual healing value of massage. Hippocrates himself is quoted as stating that “anyone wishing to study medicine must master the art of massage.”
  • 1 Years Ago

    Comment to Topic Posted by Terry McDermott › The Politics Of Massage: Alternative Treatment Or Mainstream
  •   The first documented description of massage as a technique or therapy dates back to 3,000 B.C. in China. The Chinese believed that all illness was due to an imbalance of “Qi” within the body. The inequitable distribution of this “life force” or “life energy” was blamed for all ailments and this philosophy was absorbed and incorporated by Japanese Buddhist monks into Japanese massage techniques. This eventually evolved into the unique Japanese massage therapy called Shiatsu or “finger pressure.”
  • 1 Years Ago

    Comment to Topic Posted by Terry McDermott › The Politics Of Massage: Alternative Treatment Or Mainstream
  •   I would hate to see massage go the way of today’s politics which attempt to label every political view as either liberal or conservative. Massage therapy is neither traditional nor alternative. Frankly, traditional medicine is, in actuality, an “alternative” to massage when viewed in an historical context.
  • 1 Years Ago

    Comment to Topic Posted by Terry McDermott › Dont Be Afraid To Ask Questions About Your Health.
  •   Essentially, these companies are putting pressure on doctors to prescribe their medications. But, in a way, the pharmaceutical companies have made it much easier to initiate a dialogue with your doctor. It is no longer unusual for patients to ask doctors about something they have read or heard about. Consequently, the dynamic between patient and doctor is changing. Doctors are becoming conditioned to hearing questions from patients and they are obliged to respond.
  • 1 Years Ago

    Comment to Topic Posted by Terry McDermott › Dont Be Afraid To Ask Questions About Your Health.
  •   As you know, television and magazines are saturated with advertising for various medications. Such conditions as high blood pressure, depression, arthritis, high cholesterol and even erectile dysfunction are being targeted by pharmaceutical companies with new medications. The information supporting these products encourages viewers and readers to “ask your doctor about (name of product).”
  • 1 Years Ago

    Comment to Topic Posted by Terry McDermott › Dont Be Afraid To Ask Questions About Your Health.
  •   Don't assume that you are causing a problem by asking questions. Most doctors appreciate patients who ask good questions. Feelings of fear, embarrassment or inadequacy are not good reasons for failing to ask the about things you really want to know. If you don't ask, your doctor may assume that you understand, or that you do not care to know more. He or she cannot guess what your concerns are.
  • 1 Years Ago

    Comment to Topic Posted by Terry McDermott › Lindsey Jacobellis: The End Of Snowboarding Innocence.
  •   By her self-inflicted disaster, Lindsey Jacobellis has elevatedsnowboarding to a premier winter sport. No longer will thefreewheeling, high-flying, "hey dude, watch this," X Game-stylementality apply to competitive snowboarding. It's about winningand money and national honor and endorsements. Getting ramped upand having fun are no longer permissible attitudes for thesport.
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