Sweta Christian

Sweta Christian V1 [ Registered ]

CCIEBS No. 98530 Member,Joined at 2016-07-31 20:56:50

  • Sweta Christian Recently Comments
  • 1 Years Ago

    Comment to Topic Posted by Sweta Christian › Management in Cerebral Palsy
  •   Spasticity is different from tightness; tightness is more localized without the involvement of upper motor neuron lesion as seen in spasticity. Severe spasticity if not handled properly might result in dislocations and avulsion fractures. All this factors are the negative hallmarks that might prevent the individual from ambulating and becoming functionally independent.
  • 1 Years Ago

    Comment to Topic Posted by Sweta Christian › Management in Cerebral Palsy
  •   Last but not the least in the patient-client management includes evaluating the home-environment, patient’s lifestyle and inspection of the ambulatory aides. Ambulatory aides should be inspected on a regular basis and points such as weight distribution in the wheelchair, distribution of pressure on seat and any sitting adaptations should be noted.
  • 1 Years Ago

    Comment to Topic Posted by Sweta Christian › Management in Cerebral Palsy
  •   Physical therapists should keep in mind the impairment of tone in CP. CP involves the negative and positive feature of the upper motor neuron lesion at the level of the body structure (Damiano et al.,2009). Thus the abnormal tone results in either decrease in tone (hypertonia) or hyperkinesis. The Physical therapy goals should be patient-oriented and should include realistic achievements depending upon the type of CP and surgical rhizomoty if performed.
  • 1 Years Ago

    Comment to Topic Posted by Sweta Christian › Management in Cerebral Palsy
  •   The main aspect involved in training the person with CP is to enhance the core-muscle strength of the individual. The core-muscle strength is produced by the muscles of the abdominals along with the lower lumbers. Training the required muscles helps the body to stand in an upright position against gravity. Energy consumption should also be kept in mind by the physical therapists. Low level exercises that include frequent rest intervals (avoid the formation of lactic acid) can produce effective results in CP. Specific task training exercises such as jumping, walking on treadmill, step up and down and sit to stand exercises should be performed by keeping the interval phase in between the sessions. The delivery of physical therapy should include realistic goals and improvement in the functional measure. Gross motor training exercises and exercises for improving the proprioception should be included.
  • 1 Years Ago

    Comment to Topic Posted by Sweta Christian › Management in Cerebral Palsy
  •   Damiano et al. (2009), states that walking is the most common primarily goal of improvement in CP. Damiano et al.(2009), also states that the major goal of physical therapy should include independent mobility including the ability to ambulate among the other forms of mobility. This means improving the generalized body strength and range of motion of a person in order to be able to ambulate with the wheelchair assist or the walker. The goals for the physical therapy should also focus on developing the upper- extremity strength in order to assist and pull the ambulatory aides. The physical therapist are required to improve the patient’s loading time, ability to stand in the stance phase with assistance, and ability to make a heel strike against gravity. Damiano et al. (2009), states that stretching can produce efficient result along with other interventions such as orthotic shoes, Botulinum toxin and strength and endurance training.
  • 2 Years Ago

    Comment to Topic Posted by Sweta Christian › Management in Cerebral Palsy
  •   Spasticity is different from tightness; tightness is more localized without the involvement of upper motor neuron lesion as seen in spasticity. Severe spasticity if not handled properly might result in dislocations and avulsion fractures. All this factors are the negative hallmarks that might prevent the individual from ambulating and becoming functionally independent.
  • 2 Years Ago

    Comment to Topic Posted by Sweta Christian › Management in Cerebral Palsy
  •   Last but not the least in the patient-client management includes evaluating the home-environment, patient’s lifestyle and inspection of the ambulatory aides. Ambulatory aides should be inspected on a regular basis and points such as weight distribution in the wheelchair, distribution of pressure on seat and any sitting adaptations should be noted.
  • 2 Years Ago

    Comment to Topic Posted by Sweta Christian › Management in Cerebral Palsy
  •   Physical therapists should keep in mind the impairment of tone in CP. CP involves the negative and positive feature of the upper motor neuron lesion at the level of the body structure (Damiano et al.,2009). Thus the abnormal tone results in either decrease in tone (hypertonia) or hyperkinesis. The Physical therapy goals should be patient-oriented and should include realistic achievements depending upon the type of CP and surgical rhizomoty if performed.
  • 2 Years Ago

    Comment to Topic Posted by Sweta Christian › Management in Cerebral Palsy
  •   The main aspect involved in training the person with CP is to enhance the core-muscle strength of the individual. The core-muscle strength is produced by the muscles of the abdominals along with the lower lumbers. Training the required muscles helps the body to stand in an upright position against gravity. Energy consumption should also be kept in mind by the physical therapists. Low level exercises that include frequent rest intervals (avoid the formation of lactic acid) can produce effective results in CP. Specific task training exercises such as jumping, walking on treadmill, step up and down and sit to stand exercises should be performed by keeping the interval phase in between the sessions. The delivery of physical therapy should include realistic goals and improvement in the functional measure. Gross motor training exercises and exercises for improving the proprioception should be included.
  • 2 Years Ago

    Comment to Topic Posted by Sweta Christian › Management in Cerebral Palsy
  •   Damiano et al. (2009), states that walking is the most common primarily goal of improvement in CP. Damiano et al.(2009), also states that the major goal of physical therapy should include independent mobility including the ability to ambulate among the other forms of mobility. This means improving the generalized body strength and range of motion of a person in order to be able to ambulate with the wheelchair assist or the walker. The goals for the physical therapy should also focus on developing the upper- extremity strength in order to assist and pull the ambulatory aides. The physical therapist are required to improve the patient’s loading time, ability to stand in the stance phase with assistance, and ability to make a heel strike against gravity. Damiano et al. (2009), states that stretching can produce efficient result along with other interventions such as orthotic shoes, Botulinum toxin and strength and endurance training.
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