Steven Gillman

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CCIEBS No. 14502 Member,Joined at 2016-01-29 01:29:33

  • Steven Gillman Recently Comments
  • 1 Years Ago

    Comment to Topic Posted by Steven Gillman › Ten Wilderness Survival Backpacking Tips
  •   Steve Gillman is a long-time backpacker, and advocate of lightweight backpacking. His advice and stories can be found at http://www.TheUltralightBackpackingSite.com
  • 1 Years Ago

    Comment to Topic Posted by Steven Gillman › Ten Wilderness Survival Backpacking Tips
  •   9. Injury: Pop a "blister" on the trunk of a small spruce or fir tree, and you can use the sap that oozes out as an good antiseptic dressing for small cuts.

      10. Fire starter: White birch bark will usually light even when wet.

      These are just a few of the wilderness survival tips and techniques you can easily learn. Why not practice one or two on your next backpacking trip?
  • 1 Years Ago

    Comment to Topic Posted by Steven Gillman › Ten Wilderness Survival Backpacking Tips
  •   6. Staying dry: Hypothermia is the biggest wilderness killer, and getting wet is the biggest cause. Watch for ledges or large fir trees to stand under if you see the rain coming.

      7. Shelter: A pile of dry leaves and dead grass can keep you very warm in an emergency.

      8. Hydration: Fill water bottles every chance you get, and you won't have such a hard time with any long dry stretches of trail.
  • 1 Years Ago

    Comment to Topic Posted by Steven Gillman › Ten Wilderness Survival Backpacking Tips
  •   4. Direction-finding: Mark the tip of the shadow of a stick, and mark it again fifteen minutes later. The line between the the first and second marks points east. A few techniques like this can save you when your compass is lost.

      5. Weather: In the Rocky Mountains you can see the clouds forming just before the afternoon storms. Being able to read the sky can keep you out of trouble. Lightning kills hikers in Colorado regularly.
  • 1 Years Ago

    Comment to Topic Posted by Steven Gillman › Ten Wilderness Survival Backpacking Tips
  •   2. Food: In North America, there is no berry that looks like a blueberry, strawberry, or rasberry, that can hurt you from one taste. Just spit it out if it doesn't taste right. If it looks and tastes like a blueberry - it is.

      3. Fire starter: If you put dried moss or milkweed fuzz in your pocket as you walk, you'll have dry tinder to start a fire, just in case it's raining later. Experiment with different materials.
  • 1 Years Ago

    Comment to Topic Posted by Steven Gillman › Cat Litter on Mount Shasta
  •   I found the trail, my headache disappeared, I reached the road, where John was waiting. By evening we were driving towards Michigan, Mount Shasta hidden in the clouds and smoke behind us. Oh, and yes, I did get to use the poop bag. Somewhere around 11,500 feet, I think, which I remembered when I was looking through my pack. "Pull over at the nearest garbage can," I told John.
  • 1 Years Ago

    Comment to Topic Posted by Steven Gillman › Cat Litter on Mount Shasta
  •   "You can write your name in the register there," the guy told me, pointing to something in the rocks. Guestbooks on top of mountains? Another lesson for the day. I signed in, wrote some comment, and started down the mountain.

      Sun cups, or whatever they call those depresions in the snow, fill with water in the warm afternoon sun - another discovery. I'd climb out of one ten-foot-wide bowl and slide into the pond at the bottom of the next. This was the pattern until I thankfully reached the ankle-twisting mile of rocks piled up below Helen Lake. Climbing down, I realized, is more difficult than climbing up, or at least more dangerous.
  • 1 Years Ago

    Comment to Topic Posted by Steven Gillman › Cat Litter on Mount Shasta
  •   I got used to the smell of sulphur too. Mount Shasta, it turns out, is a volcano. When John Muir climbed it more than a hundred years earlier, he had to huddle next to the hot sulphur gas vents to survive a night near the peak. He was alternately freezing and burning.

      At The Top Of Mount Shasta

      "So this is the top?" I mumbled lamely to the guy who had just told me the John Muir story. Clouds, and smoke from forest fires, obscured the view in every direction, but it felt good to be so high, and down to the east, I saw my first glacier, a few hundred feet below.
  • 1 Years Ago

    Comment to Topic Posted by Steven Gillman › Cat Litter on Mount Shasta
  •   After much climbing, I finally made it to the summit, which is called Misery hill, because it isn't actually the summit. It just seems like it should be. There was still a mile of snow to cross, and then more rocky terrain. One snow field had three-foot-high peaks covering it, like a huge merange pie.

      I rested a moment, and realized I'd been hearing a new sound. Bang! Bang! Bang! It was the inside of my head, which had never been so loud before. Hmm...interesting. I got used to the noise and pain after an hour or so.
  • 1 Years Ago

    Comment to Topic Posted by Steven Gillman › Cat Litter on Mount Shasta
  •   The "Red Bank" is a line of broken cliffs above Avalanche Gully. I scrambled, climbed, slipped on ice, and eventually found a way up and over. Then there were long steep slopes covered in loose rocks, with a few bamboo sticks marking the way. My route converged with that of the other climbers, who had come up the snow-slope route with crampons and ice axes.
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